Gun law: No effect on campus

Published 2:00am Saturday, August 24, 2013

 

 

As administrators and law enforcement officers work to determine how a gunman gained access to a Georgia elementary school, leaders and police are working hand-in-hand on a Brewton campus to eliminate the possibility here.

Dr. Daniel Bain, president at Jefferson Davis Community College, said college leaders and staff have been versed on how to keep students safe on campus.

“We had an officer with the Brewton Police Department on campus before the start of the semester,” Bain said. “Sgt. Stan Pagonis was accompanied by our police chief and three officers for the presentation. Staff members were addressed during an in-service event where the officer gave a presentation on being aware of, and acting with caution in the event of an emergency situation.”

Bain said state officials also met with college leaders to discuss the need for posting signs disallowing guns inside campus buildings.

“We have already put signs in place at every entrance to buildings on our campus that guns are not allowed,” Bain said. “We were also given an interpretation of the law during a state meeting. The emphasis is to continue to work with local law enforcement agencies in situations that could arise.”

Bain said that staff members have always done their part in keeping students on the campus safe, but the new information was a reaffirmation of the mission of the school to provide a safe environment for learning.

In public school settings, administrators are continuing efforts already in place to keep students safe.

In 2012, Brewton City School officials saw a need for additional protection at the schools and acted promptly to provide it.

“We put a resource officer on each campus on every school day,” Brewton City School Superintendent Lynn Smith said. “That policy is still in place. Resource officers are a part of the Brewton Police Department properly trained to handle crisis events.”

Smith said signs would be going up on campuses as a reminder that guns are not allowed on school grounds.

“The state gun law changes do not impact us,” Smith said. “We are governed by federal law and that supercedes any other law. We will continue to follow those laws on our campuses.”

In the Escambia County School System, Superintendent Randall Little said every precaution to prevent such a crisis in any of the county schools is being taken by staff and other personnel on each campus.

“We had a back-to-school meeting with administrators in the county back in July,” Little said. “We instructed each one to put signs on every entrance and exit at our facilities that guns are not allowed. All of those signs are now in place to make sure everyone is aware that our campuses are gun free and weapon free zones.”

Little said as an added precaution, law enforcement officials in each of the county’s districts have been contacted for beefed up protection.

“We have made contact with each law enforcement agency and the sheriff’s department to request additional patrols as the school year begins,” Little said. “We also have special signs ordered to be installed in our parking lots as well.”

Little said all staff members in the county are to follow a specific plan already in place in the event of a school-related crisis.

By Lisa Tindellnews editor
As administrators and law enforcement officers work to determine how a gunman gained access to a Georgia elementary school, leaders and police are working hand-in-hand on a Brewton campus to eliminate the possibility here.Dr. Daniel Bain, president at Jefferson Davis Community College, said college leaders and staff have been versed on how to keep students safe on campus.“We had an officer with the Brewton Police Department on campus before the start of the semester,” Bain said. “Sgt. Stan Pagonis was accompanied by our police chief and three officers for the presentation. Staff members were addressed during an in-service event where the officer gave a presentation on being aware of, and acting with caution in the event of an emergency situation.”Bain said state officials also met with college leaders to discuss the need for posting signs disallowing guns inside campus buildings.“We have already put signs in place at every entrance to buildings on our campus that guns are not allowed,” Bain said. “We were also given an interpretation of the law during a state meeting. The emphasis is to continue to work with local law enforcement agencies in situations that could arise.”Bain said that staff members have always done their part in keeping students on the campus safe, but the new information was a reaffirmation of the mission of the school to provide a safe environment for learning.In public school settings, administrators are continuing efforts already in place to keep  students safe.In 2012, Brewton City School officials saw a need for additional protection at the schools and acted promptly to provide it.“We put a resource officer on each campus on every school day,” Brewton City School Superintendent Lynn Smith said. “That policy is still in place. Resource officers are a part of the Brewton Police Department properly trained to handle crisis events.”Smith said signs would be going up on campuses as a reminder that guns are not allowed on school grounds.“The state gun law changes do not impact us,” Smith said. “We are governed by federal law and that supercedes any other law. We will continue to follow those laws on our campuses.”In the Escambia County School System, Superintendent Randall Little said every precaution to prevent such a crisis in any of the county schools is being taken by staff and other personnel on each campus.“We had a back-to-school meeting with administrators in the county back in July,” Little said. “We instructed each one to put signs on every entrance and exit at our facilities that guns are not allowed. All of those signs are now in place to make sure everyone is aware that our campuses are gun free and weapon free zones.”Little said as an added precaution, law enforcement officials in each of the county’s districts have been contacted for beefed up protection.“We have made contact with each law enforcement agency and the sheriff’s department to request additional patrols as the school year begins,” Little said. “We also have special signs ordered to be installed in our parking lots as well.”Little said all staff members in the county are to follow a specific plan already in place in the event of a school-related crisis.

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