• 72°

A bright future depends on us

By this time next year we’ll have a new President leading the country. As I hear some of the debates and do my best to follow each political parties candidates, I can’t help but look at the intangibles.

I’m so in awe of the childlike back and forth of the Republican candidates that I can’t help but ask, “Really? These people are running to lead the country? A country that is the face of the free world?”

The Democratic Party isn’t perfect, but aren’t Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton showing more grace as opponents? At least with them, I’m not distracted by a desperate display of bravado. The issues at hand can, at least, be heard.

At the end of the day, no one is an opponent, per se, because the underlying need is to continue to better America.

I’m going to say it, because it’s heavy on my heart. Trump is a good businessman, but  in my opinion, he is no President.

He was good entertainment in the beginning, but it has been troubling since he  rolled out his ideas of “Making America Great Again.”

America is great now. But there is, without a doubt, opportunities to make her much better. Don’t we need someone who can be diplomatic?

Someone who knows when to take control, but yet knows how to listen to the smartest brains in the room. Some one who understands a barricade is not the solution to our immigration problem?

What scares me is a good portion of America is responding to such notions that champion ideals of divide between cultural, social and economic classes.

The American Dream should always be at the foundation of any policy that affects an American citizen. I believe that.

I also believe as a human being, we as a race, are capable of coming together creatively and intelligibly for solutions to any challenge at hand–be it better healthcare for all, education, immigration reform, military support, gun laws, etc.

I believe universal healthcare is possible. The American citizens need it because everyone deserves the best care possible, and healthcare professionals need it, so he or she don’t have to jump through so many obstacles, which takes away the time he or she can be practicing actual health care.

The problem is listening. To be in charge you have to listen. To accomplish progress, you have to listen – not hear, listen, because no one person can bring about change. It takes the  collective. So how can you understand your brother or sister if you don’t listen?

All candidates must come to the fundamental understanding that the world is diversifying and changing. And as such, America must adapt into the overall landscape.

To adapt, one must listen. With that, shouldn’t we ask ourselves, if a candidate can’t listen, is that person fit to be President of the United States of America?