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Some ideas don’t pan out

In the first week of February 1992, there were several reports of break ins in the city, including the Escambia County Courthouse and B.C. Moore’s in the Brewton Heights Shopping Center.

First Methodist Church answered the call when they heard about hunger in Russia.

They gathered 100 boxes weighing 40 pounds each to be shipped to Russia. The same truck that picked up the food had picked up boxes in two Mississippi cities. Compared to the size of the two Mississippi cities, Brewton contributed the most. They had originally thought they could raise 50 boxes, but food just kept coming.

Leon’s closed its doors after 15 years of operation at their Brewton Heights store. The closing was blamed on the economy.

A new business was to go into the Brewton Industrial Park. Tom McMillan and Eddie Salter bought McPherson Archery Co. and brought it to Brewton from Austin Minn.

Jim Hart was named Citizen of the Year.

An Atmore man developed a cloth diaper that was supposed to save the environment from all those tons of Pampers and Huggies.

I don’t know what happened to this one. It must have not done as well as they thought they would.

There was an article in The Brewton Standard about the music by Lee Simmons, the son of Aquilla and Martha Simmons, who lived in East Brewton and apparently did very well for himself in the music industry.

Students at T.R. Miller High School banded together to see who could rock in a rocking chair the longest in order to raise money for Cystic Fibrosis. There was a whole line of rocking chairs set up with kids rocking away at the “Rock-a-thon.”

Two students signed papers declaring their intension of attending two different schools on scholarship. Marvin Davis of W.S. Neal signed with Livingston and Willie Smith with Troy University.

Lastly, there was a very cute photograph in the newspaper that was Carl Brittain’s way of wishing his wife a Happy Birthday. Ann, you looked great, but a little different than you do now.