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Standard gets new home

Sixty five years ago, in 1952, The Brewton Standard had a new home for the first time after 32 years of being elsewhere. The new building was at the corner of Douglas Avenue and Blacksher Street. This move may have been the result of a fire downtown, as the newspaper was once located in the Masonic building across from the courthouse. This building was originally a three-story one but after the fire it was only two stories high. Oh, and by the way, in 1952, the newspaper cost a nickel.

Although the Red Cross blood mobile missed its quota of 150 pints of blood and only received 87 pints. One of those pints was used to save the life of a baby at the hospital. The child had been born with the condition called “blue baby” in those days. It was said that the low number of donors were because of so many people being sick with either the measles or colds.

One of those donors was Faye Barnes Drumm, who gave a pint to make her total donation of one gallon. She said she gave that much because her son had been given that amount of blood when he was injured.

Geologists said the oil discovery made near Pollard was the single best industrial happening in many years. People were being told to be very careful about signing any land leases and to be sure to keep the taxes paid, just in case oil was discovered on the property.

I don’t know who all got rich, but it was not me.

Members of the Dixie Division were sending supplies to Texas to be used in Operation Long Horn.

Langham Texaco Service opened at 653 Douglas Avenue by Aubrey Langham.

Olen Department Store had dresses for $6.98; skirts for $2.99, and a blouse for $1.99. They also had gabardine suits for $14.95.

Now those are some good prices.

Lastly, members of the downtown merchants group met to discuss the holidays for the year. They were to close on July 4, Sept. 1, for Labor Day, Nov. 27, for Thanksgiving and Dec. 25 and 26, for Christmas. They also decided to remain open for half a day on Thursdays.