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Books, lessons, blue jeans

Forty years ago, in 1977, The Brewton Standard had some interesting stories.

Norris Lodge contributed money to the library to buy books. Gladys Byrd accepted the gift for the library.

I remember going to the library when Mrs. Byrd was there. She was always very nice and helpful to me.

Brewton received a visit from the Breath Mobile, to give out lung checks.

Police Chief Glenn Holt arrested four people on drug charges.

Now here’s one for you. There was an article in The Brewton Standard explaining the dos and don’ts of young ladies in days gone by.

Now I am old, but these rules were even older. I can tell you one thing about them, they were advising what was proper to wear and say. Needless to say, they would not work in today’s world. Too bad in some cases.

Needle work was on display at the library. Apparently people still were doing needle work and sewing. These days I can’t even find sewing materials. It’s like no one does it anymore and I can’t believe no one sews in this modern age.

Mr. W.C. Pugh on Ridge Road grew a radish of unheard proportion. It was shown in a picture of Mr. Pugh’s grandsons, DeWayne Brooks and Phillip Day.

In another field James Johnson grew potatoes and imagine his surprise when he also grew tomatoes on the same plant. It turns out that is not all that unusual. What looked like tomatoes were actually seed pods.

A plane crashed in a field on Travis Road. The pilot walked away from the crash. It was certainly his lucky day.

Carolyn Bivins gave all of us a lesson on how to make new blue jeans look old and ragged. To me that makes no sense, but apparently, everybody wanted jeans that were torn and made to look as old as possible.

It was getting to be the time of the year that principals were announcing the dates that school would open.

When I was in school, we went back to school after Labor Day, but these days the kids start earlier and earlier. Of course we didn’t have many holidays during the year.

Lastly, people were struggling through a heat wave in 1977. A lovely picture of a frozen fountain was shown in the newspaper trying to remind people of how it had been in January when it was so cold and snowy.