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Remembering 9/11: Salter recalls day

Seventeen years ago, the world stood in silence on Sept. 11, 2001, as two planes crashed into the World Trade Centers, one into the Pentagon, and another into a rural field in Pennsylvania.
Many recall that dreadful day as the worst day of modern United States history.
It was a moment that the entire world stopped and turned on televisions to see a scene of complete horror and devastation.
That one event, that one television broadcast, set this country’s fate for the next several years and spread into the present fight against terrorists.
In that moment, thousands of lives were shattered in an instant.
For the many killed at the Towers, the Pentagon, and in that lonely rural field, the whole world was shaped to what we know it now.
Many recall the exact moment of the attack and what they were doing on that morning when the first plane crashed on live television at 8:46 in New York.
As the towers gave way under the flames and crashed below, it took down with it any firefighters, police officers, citizens, and other emergency personnel who were all trying to help bring others to safety.
On that day 2,500 lives were lost, including 343 firefighters.
Brewton Fire Chief Jeffery Salter was just a regular firefighter on Sept. 11.
Salter was donning a black helmet instead of a white one and held no senior rank.
On that morning, Salter found himself at the Brewton Fire Department going about his normal daily duties.
“I came on duty that morning at eight and was out checking the trucks and inspecting them for the day, when my captain came in and told us to come watch the news. He stated that a plane had just hit the Trade Centers,” Salter said.
After the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, people started to look at firefighters and emergency personnel in a new way.
Everyone appreciated them more and started to hail them as heroes.
“Everyone views us as heroes and I love what I do. It’s rewarding job and when you can go out and help someone it is rewarding to me. I am sure all these guys at the firehouse are the same way. It doesn’t matter what kind of call it is, each is different and you never know what you are going to get,” Salter said.
“You never like seeing someone lose property. If we get a call someone is having a bad day and our guys are respectful, well-trained, and know what they need to do to get the job done. I have been with Brewton fire for 21 years. It’s a rewarding job and we get the chance to help someone and possibly save lives. Knowing that I can help someone is what keeps me doing this job,” Salter said.