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Addison helps keep local homes lovely

By BY LYDIA GRIMES – Features Reporter
Gardeners are not usually given an opportunity to stand out from the crowd. They are among those who go about their duties from day to day with no recognition except from those who notice the fruits of their labor.
One such gardener is Wesley Addison. He is almost 74 years old and while most people would be enjoying their retirement, he is still taking care of several yards and gardens in Brewton.
His magic with plants and flowers can be seen, not only at his own home and two or three of his neighbors, but at the Gordy home and the McDaniel homes on Belleville Avenue. At the Gordy home he is quick to point out the beautiful and exotic plants that he looks after. The pride he displays for all the different plants and their placement in the yard, or garden, is obvious. The Gordys have a greenhouse filled with orchids of all sizes, colors and descriptions. The greenhouse has a built-in watering system that allows the plants to be watered on a regular basis.
One thing of note in the greenhouse is the sound of music. When asked about the music, Addison explained that plants need music to grow.
There are several large planters around a patio that contain what some might not consider using as flower garden material. They are sweet potato vines and when they are in a beautiful container, they are very lovely. Several waterfalls scattered around the garden bring the splash of water and one even spills over into a packed waterlily pond. One can only wonder how that might look when the lilies are blooming.
Some of these plants, especially the orchids, may be destined to become the models used for the creation of their look-a-likes that are made in China. They are then shipped back to Brewton to become some of the beautiful replicas that are sold by NDI at the Cracked Pot. They are so detailed as to fool almost anybody and NDI sends them all over the world to decorate some of the largest and most beautiful homes.
Addison grew up in Yazoo County, Miss. and only got a third grade education because he was needed to work for the family. He lived with his mother and three sisters on the Sturdivant plantation in Yazoo County. He never knew his father until he was a grown man. He and his family were sharecroppers on the plantation which he describes as being "one of the largest in that part of the country."
When he was 21 years old he left the plantation and went to work with Southern National Gas where he stayed about two years working as a laborer. He moved from place to place for the next couple of years and found himself in California where he drove a truck for the next 15 years.
He moved back to Mississippi and stayed for a while, but was soon on the move again to Texas where he stayed about a year doing construction work.
Soon the construction work brought him to Alabama to work on the newly developing interstate system of highways. He came to south Alabama where he worked on Interstate 65 and even Highway 113 leading to the interstate.
Mrs. McDaniel confirms the years with Addison.
Addison is very quiet about his own family. He says that he had one but "that was long ago and another time. They are all grown now and have their own lives."
As for retirement, Addison does not consider it much.
Catherine Riley, who also works for the Gordys said Addison is a very hard worker.